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Susan Bradley, an 18 year Microsoft MVP focused on Windows patching and patch management has sent an open letter to Microsoft executives Satya Nadella, Carlos Picoto, and Scott Guthrie about the frustration Windows 10 users have when dealing with installing new updates. This letter includes the results of a survey taken by over 1,000 consultants and over 800 consumers regarding their experience with Windows 10 updates. Being a Microsoft MVP in Consumer Security, I have known Susan for quite some time and can tell you that she is somewhat of a legend among those who regularly support Microsoft products.  When I saw her open letter mentioned at AskWoody.com and posted at ComputerWorld, I read through many of the survey comments and decided to reach out to her to find out more about why she wrote the letter. "It's due to increasing frustration with patching and patch management issues. We have the letter on OUR FORUM.

Most of the world’s industrial products contain parts that are made in China, while many others are fully assembled in China. Now though, as part of a countrywide drive to re-focus the Chinese economy on innovation, creation and technological research and development, Chinese brands are becoming increasingly abundant even in markets where they were previously rare. Recent figures for the most widely sold smartphones across the world have seen China’s Huawei overtaken the US brand Apple as the second most popular smartphone make in the world while South Korea’s Samsung retained the number one spot. While building, promoting and gaining trust in a major brand takes time and effort, Huawei’s inroads into previously untapped markets is symptomatic of the rapid acceleration of ‘Brand China’ across the globe in a manner that parallels the rapid ascension of Japanese brands worldwide in the 1970s and 1980s when previously unfamiliar companies like Sony, Mitsubishi and Toyota became household names. read more on our Forum

Moving Windows 10 to SSD can be done in a number of ways. If your PC is having speed issues, acting sluggish and struggling to run multiple apps, a good way to boost speed is to move your Windows 10 operating system to an SSD. This is not a quick task and shouldn't be performed without knowing exactly what to do.
Prepare
Before you attempt to move Windows to SSD you should backup the data on your machine. It's unlikely that you'll lose any information, however, just in case, a full backup is advised. Next, you'll need to do is check size of the hard drive that you've currently got in your PC. The best way to do this is to check the amount of space currently being used, so you don't end up purchasing a USB that is much larger than you need. Now you know how much space you'll need, you'll need to buy an external USB drive that is equal to or greater than the size you need. Depending on how much space you need, you should be able to pick one up for between $65 and $325. ..read more on our Forum

The increase, set to take effect later this year, is likely designed to push users to move to Office 365 or Microsoft 365 subscriptions. Microsoft plans to raise the price of its perpetually-licensed Office suite by 10% in October. The increases are part of a larger strategy, said Wes Miller, an analyst and licensing expert with Directions on Microsoft. "If you add all of these motions up, and look at other lightly-announced price increases, it clearly points towards encouraging customers that have avoided licensing Office 365, or now Microsoft 365, to...look again," Miller tweeted. Microsoft announced the price increase on its partner network website on Wednesday. "Office 2019 commercial prices will increase 10% over current on-premises pricing," the company said. According to a separate FAQ (download PDF), the Office 2019 price jump "represent(s) the significant value added to the product over time and ... better reflect costs and customer demand and align with cloud pricing.
Other price increases coming read the whole article on our Forum

The number 1 issue of the Microsoft HoloLens and most mixed reality devices is the field of view, which is closely tied to immersion level. Having your virtual objects being cut off and disappearing when you turn your head slightly does nothing for making you feel they are really there. The Magic Leap headset promised to revolutionalize mixed reality but has been extremely secretive about that aspect, including commenting out the information from its recently released developer documentation. Unfortunately, as many governments discovered, that is usually not the best way to hide information from digital documents, and Next Reality managed to restore the details, finally revealing exactly how much the virtual world will fill your field of vision. The news is a combination of good and bad – the field of view is significantly bigger than the Microsoft HoloLens, but still far from immersive. Magic Leap One’s FoV is a third larger horizontally and nearly double the vertical value of the Microsoft HoloLens, and therefore approximately 45% bigger overall. It is likely that HoloLens 2 will improve significantly on this number, however, making Magic Leap’s lead pretty short lived. Full details are posted on OUR FORUM.

Polish company MedApp is using the Microsoft HoloLens to bring expert specialist medical opinions to even the most remote clinics in the world. Using the augmented reality that HoloLens provides, MedApp’s Carna Life app helps cardiologists “visualize an individual patient’s heart as it beats in their chest in real time,” said Ralf Saykiewicz, Supervisory Board Chairman at MedApp. “We utilize the HoloLens system, which gives cardiologists the ability to see the heart before they open your chest. This diminishes the time needed to perform open-heart surgery.” “We are using the tools in Microsoft Azure to develop a very advanced system of patient-generated data, of cardiac monitoring, diabetic monitoring, as well as general monitoring of human well-being, and then to manage the population health for clinics and systems,” Saykiewicz said. MedApp CEO Mateusz Kierepka felt that a partnership with Microsoft has been instrumental to their success. “In every place where we’ve collaborated with Microsoft, whether it’s been in Dubai or Brussels, we’ve received the best possible technical support from specialists in Azure and artificial intelligence. Without this kind of support, it would be impossible for us to be where we are right now as a company,” he said. Although the company is based in Krakow, Poland, Saykiewicz said using Microsoft Azure allows them to serve customers globally. “Because we use Microsoft Azure Infrastructure as a Service, we’re really a global organization. We’re able to service clients all over the world without a physical presence there because we have the cooperation of Microsoft and the support of Azure.”Find more on OUR FORUM.